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Garland Light
Tord Boontje & Artecnica
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Silver: $49
Black: $49
White: $49
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Tord Boontje is among the current crop of designers revolutionizing every-day products with an aesthetic that softens stark and undecorated modernism with a burst of nature and lyrical expressionism. For the Netherlands native, modernism doesn't have to mean minimalism, technology doesn't have to abandon emotions or the senses. This garland of flowers and leaves wraps around the included cord and fitting to create a floating poem of metal, nature and light. Available in silver, brass, black chrome and, the newest color, winter white. The garland comes flat packed. Simply bend and shape it around the fitting and bulb to create volume--just like flower arranging! Suggestion: Go to your local bulb shop and request an Edison bulb. The graphic filigree adds to the lyrical effect.

  • Assembled size varies (approx 10" x 10" x 10")
  • Cord length: 15", plug included
  • Flat-packed in large display envelope
  • This item normally ships within 48 hours


“L.A.’s uniqueness,” say the partners behind Artecnica, “is a mosaic of so many varied disciplines that have a common passion to create something that elsewhere would be thought as impossible.” Husband-and-wife team Enrico Bressan and Tahmineh Javanbakht founded the firm in 1987 and it has grown into an internationally recognized design company that collaborates with both established designers and emerging talent. With the likes of Tord Boontje, Hella Jongerius and the Campana brothers, Enrico and Tahmineh bring a vibrant and colorful slant, often with a good dollop of whimsy. 

Yet Artecnica’s output is underscored by a commitment to environmental sustainability and responsible manufacturing. Products are often made with recycled materials and transported in easy-ship flat packages to reduce the carbon footprint. And the partners continue to be inspired by California as a a “clean slate” where dreams can turn into reality. “Not that they always do—but more often than not (they) do actually happen here.”